Down the TBR Hole #27

Down the TBR hole is a weekly meme created by Lia @ Lost in a Story that revolves around clearing out all the books on your TBR you’re never going to read anyway. I’ll let Lia describe how it works:

Most of you probably know this feeling, your Goodreads TBR pile keeps growing and growing and it seems like there is no light at the end of the tunnel. You keep adding, but you add more than you actually read. And then when youre scrolling through your list, you realize that you have no idea what half the books are about and why you added them. Well thats going to change!

It works like this:

~ Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.

~ Order on ascending date added.

~ Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if youre feeling adventurous) books. Of course if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.

~ Read the synopses of the books

~ Decide: keep it or should it go?

I rejected a lot of books, which is probably a good thing since I KEEP ADDING MORE.

Down the TBR Hole

The Rejects:

The Keepers:

#3: Blood Bound by Idella Breen

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I’m not sure it particularly grabs me, but the ebook is free for the moment so I may as well give it a shot. F/F paranormal romance.

#6: Points of Departure by Emily O’Beirne

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I was iffy about this one, but I saw a reviewer complaining that there was no girl drama so I’m keeping it on my TBR out of spite.

Also, it’s queer and Aussie.

#8: Superior by Jessica Lack

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M/M superhero interns. One of my Goodreads friends has shelved it under bisexual.

#9: Not Your Sidekick by C.B. Lee

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Duh.

More queer superheroes with a Chinese-Vietnamese bi girl MC.

#19: Grace Beside Me by Sue McPherson

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Aboriginal MC with an Aboriginal author.

That said, the MC does seem overly defensive that she’s a tomboy and not gay, and there’s also ableist language. We’ll have to see. I can probably find it in a library somewhere.

TW: racism and sexual assault

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Top Five Wednesday: LGBTQIAP+ Books That Don’t Feature Cis M/M Relationships

Top 5 Wednesday is hosted by Sam @ ThoughtsOnTomes, formerly by Lainey @ GingerReadsLainey, on a Goodreads group here.

The theme for June 20th: Favorite LGBTQ+ Books That Don’t Feature Cis M/M Relationships

— This may seem oddly specific, but in honor of Pride being this month, I wanted to have a topic to celebrate LGBTQ+ books. But, the book community tends to, when given the chance, lift up cis m/m pairings the most. And while those books are still important and valued (we’ve even had topics covering m/m relationships earlier this year, which featured many cis m/m pairings), I wanted to shine the spotlight on some of those lesser known, recognized, and celebrated books.

MY TIME HAS COME.

Top Five Wednesday

1: Coffee Boy by Austin Chant (trans M/cis M)

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This is a great short read with a gay trans man MC and bi cis man love interest. There’s an age gap which is handled respectfully. It’s set in a campaign office and there’s a sex scene at the end. The dynamic between Kieran and Seth is amazing.

Review

2: Come to the Rocks by Christin Haws (F/F)

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This is another great novella that has a bisexual woman fall in love with a mermaid while grappling with her stalker ex-boyfriend.

Review

3: Girl Made of Stars by Ashley Herring Blake (F/enby, M/F)

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This YA novel has a bisexual MC with two love interests and deals with the effects of sexual assault.

Review

Bonus rec: How to Make a Wish by Ashley Herring Blake–F/F, bi MC, biracial lesbian LI, pianist/dancer, dealing with a neglectful mother and grief. Review.

4: Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova (F/F, M/F)

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The bisexual Latina MC in this YA fantasy novel accidentally wishes away her whole family while trying to get rid of her super bruja powers. She has to travel to the spirit world to get them back, and has two love interests: a Latino boy and a sapphic Indian girl. This is ownvoices for being Latinx, but not for bisexuality. The bi MC isn’t labelled in-text, but she’s only just realised she’s queer so I’m not concerned at the moment.

I saw this in my local bookshop today, which was great.

Review

5: Chameleon Moon by RoAnna Sylver (M/enby/M, F/F/F

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A hopeful dystopian NA novel with a super queer, disabled ensemble cast who have developed superpowers due to a drug and have to fight against the military who seek to keep them trapped in a burning city. Too many queer characters to count, including: asexual polyamorous anxious lizard-man, transgender polyamorous sapphic woman with a superpowered voice, amputee polyamorous sapphic woman with plant powers, a nonbinary “build-a-friend” made up of body parts from different sources. Most characters are mentally ill, with PTSD being super common.

AND THAT’S NOWHERE NEAR EVERYONE. And the F/F/F relationship is a marriage and they have a son!

Review


I LOVED MAKING THIS LIST SO MUCH. I can’t wait to read the metric fuckton of books I bought recently that also fit this brief.

Down the TBR Hole #26

Down the TBR hole is a weekly meme created by Lia @ Lost in a Story that revolves around clearing out all the books on your TBR you’re never going to read anyway. I’ll let Lia describe how it works:

Most of you probably know this feeling, your Goodreads TBR pile keeps growing and growing and it seems like there is no light at the end of the tunnel. You keep adding, but you add more than you actually read. And then when youre scrolling through your list, you realize that you have no idea what half the books are about and why you added them. Well thats going to change!

It works like this:

~ Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.

~ Order on ascending date added.

~ Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if youre feeling adventurous) books. Of course if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.

~ Read the synopses of the books

~ Decide: keep it or should it go?

I managed half-and-half this time.

Down the TBR Hole

The Rejects

The Keepers

#1: Trust Me, I’m Trouble by Mary Elizabeth Summer

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This is the sequel to Trust Me, I’m Lying, which I’m reading at the moment. This book is F/F, which was my main motivation for reading book 1, which is not. There are a few things that bother me in book 1, but not enough that it’s ruined my appetite for book 2.

I wonder if the same library that lent me book 1 will get this one for me?

#2: Collide by J.R. Lenk

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Bi boy rep! The first line of the blurb is annoying me because being bisexual is often only considered “cool” when it’s time to invalidate someone’s queerness, but that line may not be the author’s fault.

(Also, I’m going to read this out of spite for the reviewer who, for some reason, even knowing the rep is explicitly bi, is still just calling it “gay” as if that’s the same goddamn thing. Screw you, reviewer.)

#3: Been Here All Along by Sandy Hall

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Short and cute M/M romance that apparently has on-the-page bi boy rep.

#9: Dear Martin by Nic Stone

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Is this even up for debate? Here’s a portion of the blurb:

Justyce McAllister is top of his class and set for the Ivy League—but none of that matters to the police officer who just put him in handcuffs. And despite leaving his rough neighborhood behind, he can’t escape the scorn of his former peers or the ridicule of his new classmates. Justyce looks to the teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for answers. But do they hold up anymore? He starts a journal to Dr. King to find out.

#10: How It Went Down by Kekla Magoon

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Published in 2014, this seems to be the precursor to books like the one above, but more focused on a white civilian shooter than a police officer. Both are huge issues.

This one is told through four(?) different perspectives and what little I looked at on Amazon looked deliberately chaotic and disjointed. Given the subject matter, it seems likely to work well here.

Down the TBR Hole #25

Down the TBR hole is a weekly meme created by Lia @ Lost in a Story that revolves around clearing out all the books on your TBR you’re never going to read anyway. I’ll let Lia describe how it works:

Most of you probably know this feeling, your Goodreads TBR pile keeps growing and growing and it seems like there is no light at the end of the tunnel. You keep adding, but you add more than you actually read. And then when youre scrolling through your list, you realize that you have no idea what half the books are about and why you added them. Well thats going to change!

It works like this:

~ Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.

~ Order on ascending date added.

~ Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if youre feeling adventurous) books. Of course if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.

~ Read the synopses of the books

~ Decide: keep it or should it go?

More keepers than rejects this time, and I didn’t have to look at extra books to bolster my numbers.

Down the TBR Hole

The Rejects

  • #1: A Darkly Beating Heart by Lindsay SmithThe reviews for this are all over the place, but a couple of (not all) Japanese reviewers have expressed discomfort with the way Japan is treated. MC is bisexual and probably Japanese-American, and grapples with self-harm and suicidal thoughts. There’s time travel.
  • #2: Daughters of Ruin by K.D. Castner: I don’t know why I had this on my TBR, and a lot of people really seem to dislike it.
  • #9: Underneath Everything by Marcy Beller Paul: The reviews for this are really mixed. I think the MC might be bi, and the story is about a homoerotic toxic friendship. I think it might bother me too much, but I’m sure others will like it.
  • #10: Vanished by E.E. Cooper: I almost kept this on my TBR because of the bi/questioning, Indian, anxiety and OCD rep, but the author is white, it’s a cheating plot and a lot of readers aren’t satisfied with the story.

The Keepers

#3: Gena/Finn by Hannah Moskowitz and Kat Helgeson

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Hannah did a take on fandom culture. And it’s queer. Nice.

Avery has a great review, including the diverse elements: queer MCs (probably bi), Jewish MC, polyamory, mental health. All ownvoices, at least to some degree.

#4: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

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Jemisin is an African-American author. The blurb is vague, but interesting.

There are gods and stuff.

#5: All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely

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I’ve been meaning to read this book for a while. It’s about police brutality against young Black boys.

#6: Yacqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass by Meg Medina

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A story about bullying, focused on Latinx characters.

#7: All the Rage by Courtney Summers

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TW: Rape

This book does something really interesting where the MC’s rapist isn’t a featured character in the story.

#8: Radio Silence by Alice Oseman

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I’ve been putting this one off because there’s always so many other books to read, and now I have a negative association with it due to personal circumstances outside the book itself, but I own a copy and will read it eventually.

 

Top Five Wednesday: “Summer” Reads

Top 5 Wednesday is hosted by Sam @ ThoughtsOnTomes, formerly by Lainey @ GingerReadsLainey, on a Goodreads group here.

The theme for June 6th is Summer Reads:

With summer finally kicking off, now is the time to recommend your favorite summer reads, whatever that means to you!

(This is a day late according to my time zone but oh well.)

 

Top Five Wednesday

I’m Australian. It’s winter. It’s cold and sad and raining all the time. Because I’m out of sync with the Northern Hemisphere’s book community, I don’t read seasonally.

However, I tend to have a lot of free time at the end of the year when it is Summer, so I’m going to list my favourite reads from Decembers gone by. They’re not specifically summery, but they feel summery to me because they’re associated with my best reading time of the year.

#1: Ash by Malinda Lo

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I read this two summers ago for a diverse retelling challenge, and it was my introduction to Malinda Lo’s writing. Despite being a few years old, it does hold up pretty well, but you can definitely see how Malinda has developed as a writer since its publication.

This is a F/F Cinderella retelling with a (presumably) bisexual MC. And fairies. TW: child abuse.

Here’s my review. It’s a bit different from the reviews I write these days because I didn’t have my special format back then.

#2: The Paths We Choose by M. Hollis

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This is the sequel to The Melody of You and Me, which is an F/F novel featuring a pansexual MC. This one follows one of the supporting characters, Lily, through her own story and is also F/F. Lily is white Brazilian and queer (she canonically doesn’t choose an identity label). Lots of sex, but it’s not cringey. TW: anti-queer parents, discussion of racism and anti-queerness.

Here’s my review.

At this point in time, neither this book nor the first book in the series seem to be available for purchase, unfortunately. The author has on occasion updated her books, so maybe that’s what is happening at the moment. I can’t find any information about what’s going on. But if you already have a copy of either of these books, I recommended giving them a read.

If you don’t have these, A Night at the Mall is a short, fluffy F/F story by the same author and she also has plenty others.

#3: The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

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The two protagonists in this book have incredible voices. Daniel is a Korean-American boy suddenly thrust into the position of being the pride of his family when his older brother disappoints their parents. Natasha is a Jamaican girl on the cusp of deportation due to a mistake her father made.

They meet by chance, a mere twelve hours before Natasha is slated for deportation, and they fall hard for each other in different ways. The also book weaves threads of mini-stories throughout the narrative of people whose lives are impacted by these two young people just through minor interactions as they go about their day.

The writing style is so moreish and easy to read, and this probably would’ve been a five-star read if not for a few annoying issues. TW: amatonormativity (A LOT), allonormativity (A LOT), ableist language, stalkerish behaviour, suicide, racism (not condoned), discussions of historical slavery.

The writing was damn good so I ended up being really forgiving of the flaws. And THAT ENDING OMG.

Here’s my review.

#4: Chameleon Moon by RoAnna Sylver

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This is a primarily queer disabled cast with a number of characters of colour. Regan, an asexual lizard man with camouflaging abilities and anxiety, has lost his memory on a mission and is being haunted by the projection of the person who took his memories. Evelyn, a trans polyamorous sapphic woman with a superpowered voice, takes him under her wing. Other characters include: amputee polyamorous queer Woman of Colour, nonbinary characters, a character with depression. Most characters have signs of PTSD and possibly other mental illnesses.

They live in Parole, a city enclosed within a bubble to separate them and their mutations from the outside world, watched over by a militarised police force. Parole is constantly on fire, and it’s only getting worse. This is often described as a hopeful dystopia, because even though the characters are tripped in a burning prison of a city and spend much of the time on the run, they care for and comfort each other and refuse to stay knocked down for long. Characters like Evelyn and the mysterious Radio Angel use their drug-mutated powers to inspire, comfort and protect.

This book is also the best example of third person omniscient narration I have ever seen.

TW: Suicide, medical procedures, loss of limb, panic attacks

Here’s my review.

#5: Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde

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This is a story about three Australian friends who travel to America for their first comic book convention. It’s told in alternating narration between the two girls: Charlie, a pink-haired bisexual Chinese-Australian vlogger starring in her first movie, and Taylor, a plus-sized autistic girl with anxiety who’s come along to support her friend and hopefully meet her fandom idol.

It’s an extremely cute story with incredible characters. It’s commonly described as a love letter to geek culture, which is absolutely true. Charlie has just come out of an identity-consuming relationship with a jerk of a guy who happens to be her costar in the movie, and Taylor has had a huge crush on her other best friend, Jamie, for years. Charlie is trying to forge her own identity away from this guy, and has a distant-admirer-to-lovers relationship with a black (presumably lesbian) vlogger. Taylor is trying to become more assertive and reach for what she wants, even when it terrifies her.

I love them. And this story.

TW: unchallenged ableist language, anxiety attacks, slut-shaming (addressed), bimisia (addressed), unchallenged amatonormativity/aromisia.

Here’s my review.

Review: Love, Hate and Other Filters by Samira Ahmed

36275385Maya Aziz dreams about kissing boys and going to film school in New York, but miles away, an unknown danger looms. A terrorist attack in another city unleashes fear and hate in Maya’s small town, changing her life and disrupting her future.

A stunning debut novel that celebrates the power of personal voice in a world that wants to put labels on us all.

The above blurb is taken from my paperback edition rather than Goodreads, because it’s so markedly different. Here’s the Goodreads blurb:

Maya Aziz is torn between futures: the one her parents expect for their good Indian daughter (i.e.; staying nearby in Chicago and being matched with a “suitable” Muslim boy), and the one where she goes to film school in New York City–and maybe, just maybe, kisses a guy she’s only known from afar. There’s also the fun stuff, like laughing with her best friend Violet, making on-the-spot documentaries, sneaking away for private swimming lessons at a secret pond in the woods. But her world is shattered when a suicide bomber strikes in the American heartland; by chance, he shares Maya’s last name. What happens to the one Muslim family in town when their community is suddenly consumed with hatred and fear?

See also on Goodreads.

Details at a glance:

Title: Love, Hate and Other Filters

Series/Standalone: Standalone

Author: Samira Ahmed

Genre: YA Contemporary

First published: 2018

Format: Paperback

Pairings: M/F

Sexual content: None

Rep: Indian Muslim MC

Ownvoices: Yes

Content warnings: Ableist language, racism, Islamophobia, islamophobic violence, white supremacists, a joke about homophobia


This is an incredible little book, especially from a debut author.

Note: the terrorist attack mentioned in the blurb doesn’t happen until about halfway through the book. It’s an important factor in the story and handled extremely well, but I was surprised that it occurred so late given the blurb puts it front and centre. Its placement works well within the narrative itself, so that’s more due to the expectations set by the blurb than any issues with the book itself. In the context of the story, its placement makes sense.

The first half of this novel reads like a contemporary YA romance, including the love triangle, and I know that will put some readers off, but the love triangle doesn’t feel stale or overdone at all. The aspect of Maya being an Indian Muslim girl grappling with family expectations of dating a “suitable” boy from the same background really makes it stand out, even before the terrorist attack makes a mess of things.

Maya is a wonderful character. Her interest in filmmaking shapes the narration in utterly striking ways, and her little quirks and flaws made her feel so much like a real person. She doesn’t always know what she wants right away, and is sometimes surprised by the sacrifices she has to make when she does realise, but at no point did I find her frustrating.

Maya has an amazing friend in Violet, who supports her without question and stands up for her whenever necessary… and sometimes when unnecessary. She’s the kind of friend Maya really needs, especially when the terrorist attack occurs and Maya and her families suddenly have targets on their backs. There are times when Maya is unsure of herself, or doesn’t want to make a scene, so Violet steps up and advocates for her. What a legend.

I loved both the love interests. Phil and Kareem are lovely boys who care deeply for Maya. They’re not perfect, but they recognise their shortcomings and, Phil especially, are not shy to apologise when they mess up. Kareem was also a great character and extremely supportive of Maya, and it’s great to see a Muslim male character portrayed so positively.

There are some great conversations about different ways to be Muslim, as well as Islamophobia, especially during times of crisis. I won’t pull up any specific quotes because I don’t want to ruin the effect of reading them for the first time. Violet and Phil also exhibit examples of allyship, especially in the face of Islamophobia.

A few issues: I really didn’t appreciate the joke about “don’t ask, don’t tell” given the phrase is inextricably linked with the now-defunct US military policy of discharging anyone who is openly gay. And, of course, there’s the seemingly ever-present ableist language. I had almost forgotten about the joke until I went through my notes, and that’s the main reason why I gave this four instead of five stars.

Overall, however, this is an amazing, cinematic read that tackles important issues while respecting the characters’ hopes and dreams and youthfulness. If you can stomach the Islamophobia (which does turn violent), I’d strongly recommend reading this.

Ownvoices reviews: Fadwa and Maha

May 2018 Wrap-Up

May seems to be a bit of a slump month for me, so I’m just glad I read as much as I did… even if I’d planned to read more.

Monthly Wrap-Up

Book Haul

  • Leah on the Offbeat by Becky Albertalli
  • Love, Hate and Other Filters by Samira Ahmed
  • Stone Girl by Eleni Hale
  • A Girl Like That by Tanaz Bhathena
  • The Interrogation of Ashala Wolf by Ambelin Kwaymullina (from classmate)

Books Read

  1. George by Alex Gino
  2. Skylarks by Karen Gregory (review)
  3. A Line in the Dark by Malinda Lo (short Goodreads review)
  4. Warcross by Marie Lu (review)

The last two were part of an attempt at the Asian Lit Bingo, but I didn’t do very well.

Blog Posts (except reviews)

  1. TTT: Books I’d Slay a Lion to Get Early
  2. T5W Rewind: Books You’ve Read Because of Social Media
  3. April 2018 Wrap-Up
  4. Down the TBR Hole #23
  5. #AsianLitBingo 2018 TBR
  6. T5W Rewind: Tropes I Hate
  7. Down the TBR Hole #24
  8. #AsianLitBingo Wrap-Up

Real Life Updates

  • Participated in National Simultaneous Storytime with my classmates and read to some adorable toddlers.
  • New puppy!

This picture is enormous because WordPress is annoying.

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Her name is Bella.

#AsianLitBingo Wrap-Up

I bit off more than I could chew this month, so this will just be a short post.

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I set out to read five books for Asian Lit Bingo. Here’s my announcement post. Unfortunately, I was only able to read two:

  • A Line in the Dark by Malinda Lo (I liked this right up until the end: short Goodreads review) – Ownvoices
  • Warcross by Marie Lu (This was awesome: review) – Ownvoices

These two were library books so I had a short time to read them anyway. The other three books I’d planned to read are books I own, so I’ll get to them eventually. It just wasn’t going to happen this month. I think May might just generally be a slump month for me, because I never seem to do well on this challenge.

Maybe next year?

Review: Warcross by Marie Lu

36160193For the millions who log in every day, Warcross isn’t just a game—it’s a way of life. The obsession started ten years ago and its fan base now spans the globe, some eager to escape from reality and others hoping to make a profit. Struggling to make ends meet, teenage hacker Emika Chen works as a bounty hunter, tracking down players who bet on the game illegally. But the bounty hunting world is a competitive one, and survival has not been easy. Needing to make some quick cash, Emika takes a risk and hacks into the opening game of the international Warcross Championships—only to accidentally glitch herself into the action and become an overnight sensation.

Convinced she’s going to be arrested, Emika is shocked when instead she gets a call from the game’s creator, the elusive young billionaire Hideo Tanaka, with an irresistible offer. He needs a spy on the inside of this year’s tournament in order to uncover a security problem . . . and he wants Emika for the job. With no time to lose, Emika’s whisked off to Tokyo and thrust into a world of fame and fortune that she’s only dreamed of. But soon her investigation uncovers a sinister plot, with major consequences for the entire Warcross empire.

I know a lot of people who really loved this book, so I was bound to read it eventually. It was incredible and I want the sequel now.

See this review on Goodreads.

Details at a glance:

Title: Warcross

Series/Standalone: Series (book 1)

Author: Marie Lu

Genre: YA science fiction

First published: 2017

Format: Paperback

Pairings: M/F, hinted side M/M

Sexual content: Implied, open for interpretation

Rep: working class Chinese-American MC (former foster child), Japanese LI, paraplegic character, possibly Latina (Afrolatina?) character, queer brown character (ethnicity not specified)

Ownvoices: Chinese-American

Content warnings: Ableist language, sexual harassment, cyber-bullying, rape mention


Warcross is set in a semi-futuristic world altered by the invention of integrated virtual reality technology. The worldbuilding mixes old and new to create a living, breathing vision of a society just a little ahead of us in technological development, but with many of the same issues we have.

Emika Chen is an incredible protagonist, with her rainbow hair and tattoos and a strong sense of morality that doesn’t always line up with the law… because the law is sometimes inadequate. She’s a talented hacker, using artistic techniques her father taught her to spot errors in code that she can either correct or exploit to her own advantage. Her strong morality and coding prowess collided when she was younger in a situation that earned her a criminal record and shut off many of her avenues for making a living.

Her growing relationship with Hideo Tanaka was exciting and entertaining, and Hideo himself is a fascinating character. He’s that charismatic tortured billionaire genius archetype, except he’s not a white dude. And he’s generally a respectful person… unlike many characters of this type. He and Emika are by far the two most developed characters in the entire story, but given Emika is somewhat isolated because of the job he’s given her, it’s not exactly a surprise or even an issue. Their scenes together are varied and engrossing, and I imagine the other characters will be more developed in the sequel given the way they’ve been set up.

The action scenes are exciting and I found myself practically shoving the book in my face on multiple occasions during the first competitive game of the Warcross tournament. That’s possibly the best-written part of the entire book, at least out of the action scenes. I sometimes find these scenes difficult to read, but these weren’t too bad.

I called one of the plot twists quite early on, but I don’t find that to be a problem, exactly. I definitely didn’t call the other major plot twist anyway. Predictability isn’t always a bad thing, and I find that adds an extra element of excitement to the story because I want to find out if my guess was correct.

Overall, Warcross was a heart-pumping, well-executed novel and I’m excited for what the sequel holds.

Down the TBR Hole #24

Down the TBR hole is a weekly meme created by Lia @ Lost in a Story that revolves around clearing out all the books on your TBR you’re never going to read anyway. I’ll let Lia describe how it works:

Most of you probably know this feeling, your Goodreads TBR pile keeps growing and growing and it seems like there is no light at the end of the tunnel. You keep adding, but you add more than you actually read. And then when youre scrolling through your list, you realize that you have no idea what half the books are about and why you added them. Well thats going to change!

It works like this:

~ Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.

~ Order on ascending date added.

~ Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if youre feeling adventurous) books. Of course if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.

~ Read the synopses of the books

~ Decide: keep it or should it go?

I don’t know why, but several Goodreads reviews just eternally buffered on my browser so I had to switch to the mobile app for a bit. I blame the NBN. Because I hate the NBN. We could’ve had nice fibre optic cable but noOoOo we got stuck with copper wiring because our government is decades behind every other human being alive and doesn’t know how to listen to people who actually know what they’re talking about.

Down the TBR Hole

The Rejects:

  • #1: Time it Right by Siera Maley: a lot of readers seem to dislike the way the MC treats the LI. It sounds super infuriating.
  • #2: Endangered by Lamar Giles: This seems interesting, but the reviews are kinda meh. The Kindle version isn’t available in Australia unless I do some region hopping magic (which I prefer not to do) and it’s a touch pricey for a book I’m not 100% invested in.
  • #5: The Vicious Deep by Zoraida Córdova: This one’s a few years old and I don’t want to ruin my enjoyment of Zoraida’s current writing by going back in time that far. If you’re interested, it has mermaids.

The Keepers:

#3: Seven Tears at High Tide by C.B. Lee

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Selkie M/M romance! The asking price for the ebook is a tad ridiculous, but I might grab a physical copy eventually. I’ve been meaning to read C.B. Lee’s books for a while. Gimme that queer shit.

#4: Binti by Nnedi Okorafor

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Sci-fi novella with a black MC, written by a black woman.

#6: Tiny Pretty Things by Sona Charaipotra and Dhonielle Clayton

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I own this. I was planning to read this for Asian Lit Bingo but I’ve fallen pretty badly behind, so we’ll see.

#7: Flygirl by Sherri L. Smith

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I’m not the biggest historical fiction reader, but this is about a light-skinned black female pilot in World War II who has to hide her race so she can fly with the Women Airforce Service Pilots. The author is a black woman.

#8: Orleans by Sherri L. Smith

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This is by the same author as above, and this one is a dystopian/post apocalyptic novel with no romance! TW: rape.

#9: Timekeeper by Tara Sim

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It’s probably a crime that I haven’t read this yet. A steampunk M/M YA novel that I haven’t read yet? I plead guilty. I’m sorry.

#10: The Reader by Traci Chee

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I have friends who adored this book. It seems to be set in a secondary world where most people are illiterate (or are simply not allowed to read? I’m not sure), and the MC discovers a book that helps her on her journey.

There are pirates.